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Taste presents
CONTAINED | CONTENU

20 April - 7 October 2018

Musée Ariana
Genève, Switzerland

In Contained |  Contenu, Taste Contemporary, in collaboration with Musée Ariana, was proud to present the unique voices of seven internationally renowned artists working in ceramics and glass, each of whom explored particular sensibilities and concerns of containment in an exhibition of works that inhabited the territory between the physical and the emotional.

In addition these artists demonstrated that while materiality, form and process are intrinsic to their practice, different approaches to function also exist within their expressive vocabulary as they engage with the notion of containment.


About the Artists

 Alison Britton,  Freight , 2018, Handbuilt, high fired Earthenware, 36.5H x 43W x 28D cm

Alison Britton, Freight, 2018, Handbuilt, high fired Earthenware, 36.5H x 43W x 28D cm

Alison Britton

Britain b. 1948

Today a leading British ceramic artist, Britton was one of an influential group of students who came out of the Royal College of Art in the 1970s. Their radical work challenged and deconstructed notions of ceramics and particularly functional pottery – a movement that came to be known as ‘The New Ceramics’.  Britton has concentrated on making, studying and understanding pots.  Her distinctive sculptural works blur the line between art and craft. Works are hand-built from rolled slabs of clay, not thrown on a wheel. Surfaces are exuberantly covered with marks that refer to modern painting as much as the decorative patterns that tend to belong to craft, and by pouring and painting slip, then glaze, across their surfaces.


 Anne Marie Laureys,  Dappled Cloud , 2018, Belgian Clay, 38H x 40W x 35D cm

Anne Marie Laureys, Dappled Cloud, 2018, Belgian Clay, 38H x 40W x 35D cm

Anne Marie Laureys

Belgium b. 1962

Anne Marie Laureys thinks of her ceramics as metaphors for feelings. She starts the process by throwing a classic, symmetrical pot. Whilst the clay is still soft and wet, she pulls, folds, pinches and punctures it. The tension of the clay underneath her fingers dictates the way the folds take shape. Her pieces have a spontaneous, unplanned quality but in reality she takes her time to find the shape of a vessel, remoulding and refolding the clay over and over again until it speaks with her unique voice. No two works are ever the same. Her ceramics are renowned for their sense of excitement, freshness and tactility.


 Deirdre McLoughlin,  Red Life III , 2010, High fired ceramic, diamond polished, oxide markings, turquoise stone., 23H x 21W x 33D cm

Deirdre McLoughlin, Red Life III, 2010, High fired ceramic, diamond polished, oxide markings, turquoise stone., 23H x 21W x 33D cm

Deirdre McLoughlin

Ireland b. 1949

The archetypal form, the ovoid, remains central in Deirdre McLoughlin’s work. Imbued with an intense physicality and dedication to perfection of form and surface, her sculptures are layered with meaning, charged with movement, a feeling of power, a sense of purity.  Her making process is slow and demanding - she describes it as follows. "The works are coiled with a building and breaking movement over days into weeks, concentrated and chaotic by turn till in an instant the work seems right, seems to have its own logic.”  Then she begins the process of polishing and grinding through multiple firings.


 Richard Meitner,  Aucune Idee , Terrazzo technique-glass, fiberglass, mica, epoxy, etc. 40H x 35W x 20D cm.

Richard Meitner, Aucune Idee, Terrazzo technique-glass, fiberglass, mica, epoxy, etc. 40H x 35W x 20D cm.

Richard Meitner

USA b. 1949

Richard Meitner’s objects investigate the many ways in which glass can be manipulated; it can be precisely or hazily defined, it can be combined with other materials such as wood and metal, it can be abstract or figurative, and it can exploit colour or the absence of colour.  His desire to change the ways in which things are perceived as well as his ongoing pursuit of beauty, links him with the French Surrealists. They too worked with imagery that is perplexing and provocative, meant to jolt the viewer out of their comforting assumptions.  In his work Meitner looks to surprise, to challenge the viewer to question what he or she is viewing. “Magic,”’ he says, “is a moment in which something happens that does not fit into your belief system.”


 Marit Tingleff,  Doubles - Red and White  series, Red Earthenware and White Stoneware, red and white slips, glossy transparent glaze.

Marit Tingleff, Doubles - Red and White series, Red Earthenware and White Stoneware, red and white slips, glossy transparent glaze.

Marit Tingleff

Norway b. 1954

Marit Tingleff is one of Norway’s most celebrated contemporary ceramic artists. Initially studying at the National College of Art and Design in Bergen, she went on to become Pro­fes­sor and Head of Ce­ram­ics at Oslo Na­tional Acad­emy of the Arts [KhiO] from 2013 – 2016. Her work is expressive, with strongly ornamental features and undulating, organic lines.  Taking the landscape of her own daily life as a starting point for her large-scale ceramic plates, she takes ordinary, everyday objects and elevates them to something much more powerful.  Her painterly application of colourful glazes reference nature, land and seascapes and despite a complex process of glazing and firing, she maintains an incredible sense of spontaneity, balancing areas of light and dark, pattern and empty space while playing with different ways of mark making. 


 Andrea Walsh,  Collection of Contained Boxes on a White Plinth , 2018, Lost Wax Cast Glass, Fine Bone China, 22ct Burnished Gold, Burnished Platinum, 9H x 100W x 20D cm

Andrea Walsh, Collection of Contained Boxes on a White Plinth, 2018, Lost Wax Cast Glass, Fine Bone China, 22ct Burnished Gold, Burnished Platinum, 9H x 100W x 20D cm

Andrea Walsh

Britain b. 1974

Andrea Walsh established her studio in 2005 following the completion of a degree in fine art, and postgraduate study in glass at Edinburgh College of Art. She has since received invaluable support from the Crafts Council (UK) and Creative Scotland, enabling the continued creative development of her practice that pushes the boundaries of her chosen materials – ceramics and glass.  A significant contribution to her practice has been the award of residencies, the most notable being the ‘Artist Into Industry Residency’ through the British Ceramics Biennial – a project with the ‘Minton’ brand based at the Wedgwood ceramics factory in Stoke-on-Trent (UK), which facilitated learning directly from master craftsmen, and allowed privileged access to historical archives. This opportunity continues to influence her practice to the present day.


 Jeremy Maxwell Wintrebert,  Vessels , 2018, Free-Hand Blown Glass, 58H x 300W x 50D cm

Jeremy Maxwell Wintrebert, Vessels, 2018, Free-Hand Blown Glass, 58H x 300W x 50D cm

Jeremy Maxwell Wintrebert

France b. 1980

Jeremy Maxwell Wintrebert is one of the most interesting glass artists working today.  For the past decade he has created large organic, ethereal glass vessels combining a contemporary artistic approach with a mastery of freehand glassblowing techniques. Jeremy was born in Paris, raised on the west coast of Africa and has travelled the world in pursuit of his craft since he first walked into a glassblowing studio aged 19. “That was it,” he remembers, “I saw this molten, transparent, white hot orb and it was actually emitting light. It was dangerous and sexy and I was incredibly attracted to it.”